technology

Radio Ambulate

Posted on October 25, 2015. Filed under: media that matters, politics, Social Media, technology, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , |

Radio Ambulate logo

I recently discovered a great podcast in Spanish called Radio Ambulate. Its episodes are very interesting. It’s creators also do some podcasts in English. There was a recent episode about Guatemala called “Rununcia Ya” (Resign Now). In 22 minutes, it tells the story about how the Guatemalan people forced its President to resign. The Renuncia Ya movement started off as a Facebook post and grew into a series of mass popular protests.

Renuncia Ya episode (Radio Ambulate website)

Renuncia Ya episode (iTunes)

A follow up piece in English with Francisco Goldman is also worth listening to.  He wrote a recent New Yorker Magazine story about the events and the back-story entitled ”

From President to Prison: Otto Pérez Molina and a Day for Hope in Guatemala

Francisco Goldman Episode (Radio Ambulante website)

Francisco Goldman Episode on iTunes

When I lived in Guatemala (in the late-1980s), speaking out publicly against the government would get you killed.  It is heartening that, although corruption, violence, and political killings are still rampant in Guatemala, its people are now able to engage in political dissent in a public way.  Perhaps not always safely, but it appears that there is now more space to voice concerns .

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A Fast Food Company That Cares for the Environment

Posted on October 19, 2013. Filed under: Art, food, interesting, learning, media that matters, music, politics, Social Media, technology, Uncategorized, video | Tags: , , |

Here is an example of a fast food company that sources sustainably raised agricultural products, including Niman Ranch pork.  It has hired small media company to produce a video and an iphone application to tell the story of how industrialized agriculture is destroying the planet.  Watch the video they created (soundtrack by Fiona Apple):

and then what the behind the scenes video:

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If you love great films, Let Your Voice Be Heard!

Posted on June 20, 2012. Filed under: Art, learning, media that matters, politics, technology, Uncategorized, video | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Do you love great documentary films?  Would you like to see them on your local public television station?  A recent Center for Social Media report showed strong public support for public-purpose programming and popular anger that many public television stations decide to repeatedly air programs like Antiques Roadshow during prime viewing hours, while relegating meaningful documentary films few slots, frequently in the middle of the night.  In addition, many public television station choose not to air many meaningful documentaries at all.

Please help make sure that your local public television affiliate knows what you value. POV and Independent Lens both fund and distribute some of the best new docs on public television stations throughout the United States.  They publicize these films and release schedules for when they are going to air.  However, if you have ever tried to watch a documentary on your local public television station, you have likely found that the show that you want to watch is not airing on the date or time that was advertised.    Local affiliates have discretion over which shows to air and when to schedule them.   Here in the Washington DC area, we are lucky to have three public television stations, WHUT, WETA, MPT.   Unfortunately, WHUT, WETA and MPT frequently air ITVS’ Independent Lens, and POV and other great documentaries not on the dates and times advertised for national distribution, but mostly if they choose to air them at all, they air them days or weeks later, in the wee hours of the night.

Nationally, Public Broadcasting Service (“PBS”) has decided to promote documentaries into a more desirable time frame.  This fall, PBS will program POV documentaries to air on Monday early evening time slot.  The purpose of this blog post is to encourage documentary lovers and all lovers of great films to encourage your local PBS affiliate to follow PBS’ lead and air Independent Lens and POV documentaries on Monday evenings, at the times and days that they air nationally.  To the uninitiated, this seems like a relatively minor issue.  However, for documentary filmmakers, the issue is quite important for building audiences and promoting their films.  Obviously, it is not desirable to have your film air at one in the morning, but having it air on a different date in every major city is also a tremendous impediment to viewers like you and me.   Please contact your local public television affiliate and encourage it air these great films during the same days and times are they are intend to be seen nationally.

Click here to send an email WETA: http://www.weta.org/contact

WETA, 3939 Campbell Avenue, Arlington, VA 22206

Phone: 703-998-2600

Or contact Maryland Public Television here: directconnection@mpt.org

Maryland Public Television
11767 Owings Mills Boulevard
Owings Mills, MD 21117-1499

Phone: 410-356-5600
Fax: 410-581-4298

Or contact WHUT here: http://www.whut.org/whut/?page_id=28

WHUT
Howard University Television
2222 Fourth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20059
202-806-3200

For more context, see:

http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org/blog/future-public-media/pbs-decides-showcase-indie-work

http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org/blog/future-public-media/pbs-finds-spot-independent-lens-and-pov%E2%80%94-where

http://mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/09/pbs-will-move-series-of-films-to-monday-night/

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/19/business/media/schedule-changes-hurt-pbs-film-series.html?_r=1

http://kartemquin.com/newsletter/4531/pbs-needs-indies-a-success-%E2%80%94-pbs-moves-pov-independent-lens-to-monday-night

http://www.current.org/indies/indies1209treaty.html

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Art Project

Posted on March 27, 2011. Filed under: Art, interesting, learning, media that matters, technology, video | Tags: |

It’s now possible to visit about a dozen art museums around the world without ever leaving the comfort of your home.

Visit: http://www.googleartproject.com/

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Scribd news

Posted on May 8, 2010. Filed under: media that matters, Social Media, technology, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

A very good document hosting site that I have reviewed before is Scribd. It is going to get even better. It is transitioning from Flash to HTML5.

HTML5 will run on iphones and ipads, unlike Flash. Plus it will be more expansive taking up the whole browser rather than sitting in a little window. Plus, it will download faster. In addition, the service is about to introduce compatibility with Google Docs. this will make Scribd much more usable and useful.

For more, see:
Scribd: HTML5 & The Future of Publishing

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Funny video using the concept of fair use

Posted on June 29, 2008. Filed under: Social Media, technology |

Fair use is a concept that allows an artist to use pieces of material that is under copyright protection and repurpose it.

From http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vxCgxRzjFQ

This video brilliantly inserts John McCain into the final scene of Pulp Fiction, and juxtaposes the words of Samuel L. Jackson’s character, Jules Winnfield, with the speech in order to create the illusion of a direct conversation between McCain and his critics. Note the moment that Jules refers to McCain as “the evil man.” An Obama ‘08 logo is the last image of the video, but the video is unaffiliated with the Obama campaign

Learn more about Fair use at http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org/

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From the Personal Democracy Forum (PDF08)

Posted on June 25, 2008. Filed under: interesting, media that matters, Social Media, technology | Tags: , , , , , , |

Repost from:

Daily Digest: Power Corrupts. PowerPoint Corrupts Absolutley.
By Nancy Scola, 06/24/2008 – 3:54pm

This is Day Two of the 2008 Personal Democracy Forum and we’ll be (mostly) devoting the Daily Digest to a recap of what’s going down at the conference, being discussed in the halls, and heating up the back channels. We’ll return to our regular digest format tomorrow.

Visual presentation virtuoso Larry Lessig at a text-only mid-morning press conference here at PdF ’08: “I’m a little lost because I don’t have slides.”

Google evangelist and wise guy Vint Cerf: “PowerPoint corrupts. PowerPoint corrupts absolutely.”

(Yes, we know Larry uses Keynote in his presentations. But still, that’s a great line.)

Bad weather kept keynoter Elizabeth Edwards away from New York City in body but she was still able to appear at PdF ’08 via Skype, which preformed remarkably well. The upside of Elizabeth staying in North Carolina? Her husband, John, popped into view of Elizabeth’s laptop camera [here’s a photo] and stuck around to say a few words. The New York TimesKatharine Seely reports on the tech-focused discussion between Elizabeth and the PdF crowd.

NPR’s Sunday Soapbox “field vlogger” Jacob Soboroff conducted video interviews with MySpace IMPACT’s Lee Brenner, the Huffington Post’s Arianna Huffington and Open Left’s Matt Stoller. Also in NPR land, Soapbox’s senior producer Davar Ardalan responds to Jay Rosen’s take on notes on “semi-pro” journalism presented at a PdF panel yesterday morning and posted to TechPres last night, saying that digital integration “brings with it many philosophical questions about editorial control and the ethical rules we have all been trained to follow.”

Over on the tech blog ArsTechnica, Julian Sanchez responds to yesterday’s discussion over the modern media’s “fake neutrality,” to borrow a phrase from Arianna.

Silicon Alley responds to McCain advisor Mark Sohoo’s defense yesterday of his candidate’s relationship with the Internet. The Guardian UK also has coverage of the session under the in-no-way-judgmental headline “Republicans Admit Obama is Winning the Online Battle.” Ooh, this just in: source material — video of the exchange between Mark and John Edwards’ online staffer Tracy Russo that has had people talking since.

CNN’s iReport has a station set up here and the conference and has gone live with interviews and coverage with attendees.

Virtual reality pioneer Mark Pesce gave a keynote this morning on “hyperpolitics — American style” that both Twitter and room tone seemed to indicate was very well-received. If the reporting on the speech strikes you as slightly fuzzy, that’s because I unfortunately arrived at the talk where there was only about three minutes left; no worries, though, because Mark has generously posted the full text of his presentation.

PdF’s Alison Fine has great coverage of Doug Rushkoff talk on “The New Renaissance” and Morely Winegard’s presentation on the civic engagement of the millennial generation.

PC World covers the unveiling of Internet for Everyone, a new Free Press-engineered push for universal broadband launched at PdF ’08 this morning. Nancy Scola (hey, that’s me) has a quick guide to the the bite-sized arguments made by the project’s supporters, from Vint Cerf to Writers Guild East president Michael Winship to TechPres contributor David All.

CNET’s Caroline McCarthy reports on Larry Lessig’s exhortation to the PdF crowd to not fall into the “four-year trap” of keeping a close watch on politics and politicians only when election time rolls around.

Nancy Scola (again, me) reflects upon a session featuring Mayhill Fowler where the OffTheBus contributor called for bloggers to agree to some “code of the road” that creates a safe, off-the-record space for press.

ThePoint.com’s Alex Steed is doing some granular liveblogging of the conference.

Of course, there’s more going on than we can possibly capture. So check out the Twitter stream tagged #pdf2008 on Summize.

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1st Amendment? Never heard of it, says FCC

Posted on June 25, 2008. Filed under: interesting, media that matters, Social Media, technology | Tags: , , , , , |

repost from

http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/Media Re:public

encouraging collaborative, practical research and analysis of the new media (r)evolution

The FCC says they want to make it easy for someone to deliver wireless broadband for free. But, as we say here at Berkman, there is free as in beer, and free as in speech. And the FCC’s new idea is UNFREE as in speech. Why? Because the license for the spectrum they want to auction requires a mechanism that “filters or blocks images and text that constitute obscenity or pornography and…any images or text that otherwise would be harmful to teens and adolescents. For purposes of this rule, teens and adolescents are children 5 through 17 years of age. As someone pointed out in a gahering here at Berkman just now, that puts the United States right up there with China. Further, the rule states, “should any commercially-available network filters installed not be capable of reviewing certain types of communications, such as peer-to-peer file sharing, the licensee may use other means, such as limiting access to those types of communications.”

The problem is the ruling makes the Internet like broadcast television or radio, where we still can’t use George Carlin’s seven words, when it really should be like the telephone, where it’s none of your @O#*$U# business what I want to talk about. I am neither a lawyer nor a technologist, but I know this is BAD. I read the text (actually I just searched for the word “pornography” and read that bit) and then went here to tell the FCC how I felt. (The comments submission form is very tricky, the 2 relevant dockets are 07-195, and 04-356, but I found it rejected my attempts to put them in myself (got an error message after submitting) so I clicked on proceedings and search for them.

That’s the basic Internet freedom part.

There’s also the sleazy background part about the M2Z, the company that’s pushing this. Business Week points out that one of the two founders of M2Z is a former FCC official. The company’s site encourages visitors to send letters to Congress and the FCC tell them to support “free, family-friendly, nationwide broadband.” Wendy suggested they rename it the “free, family-friendly, FILTERband.”

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Must have applications (an RSS Reader and a personalized Homepage)

Posted on June 8, 2008. Filed under: technology |


Stay up to date

Google Reader constantly checks your favorite news sites and blogs for new content. Whether a site updates daily or monthly, you can be sure that you won’t miss a thing.

Simplify your reading experience
Google Reader shows you all of your favorite sites in one convenient place. It’s like a personalized inbox for the entire web.

Use Google Reader on any computer
You can access your Google Reader account from any computer with online access. Whether you’re at home, at work or abroad, your subscriptions stay with you.

See http://www.google.com/help/reader/tour.html


While I am evangelizing for Google, I might was well point out igoogle, another must have personalized homepage application:

See http://www.google.ca/ig?hl=en
and
lifehacker.com-igoogle contest results

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A must see video: What is wrong with our democracy

Posted on June 7, 2008. Filed under: interesting, learning, media that matters, Social Media, technology, video |

Lawrence Lessig’s presentation today @ the National Conference on Media Reform

Why our government believes 2 plus 2 does not equal 4.

[blip.tv ?posts_id=978031&dest=-1]

visit http://change-congress.org/

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